Wozzeck, The Metropolitan Opera

George Grella, New York Classical Review

"The music for the Captain and the other tenors, especially Russell Thomas as Andres, pushes into the stratosphere, and all the singers were impressive, showing strength and clarity in their upper ranges."

Wozzeck, The Metropolitan Opera

Anthony Tommasini, New York Times

"The tenor Russell Thomas is a vocally hearty Andres, Wozzeck's only friend."

Wozzeck, The Metropolitan Opera

David Salazar, Latinos Post

"Russell Thomas, who played Wozzeck's "friend" Andres, provided some really thrilling high notes in the second act of the work. .. "

Il Trovatore, Cincinnati Opera

Janelle Gelfand, Cincinnati Enquirer

"And what a joy it was to hear the stunning tenor voice of Russell Thomas as Manrico. He sang consistently with ardent expression and spine-tingling high notes. His pairing with Barton was believable and magnetic."

Il Trovatore, Cincinnati Opera

Mary Ellyn Hutton, www.musicincinnati.com

"Thomas made an inspiring Manrico, his voice literally rising to the occasion, including his showcase aria, "Di quella pira," where he vows to save Azucena."

Tosca, Los Angeles Philharmonic

Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times

"Thomas, who was Lazarus in Dudamel's performance ofJohn Adams' "The Gospel According to the Other Mary," was also thrilling, powerful vocally and without excess."

Tosca, Los Angeles Opera

Richard S. Ginell, LA Times

"As Mario Cavaradossi, Russell Thomas['s] ... rendition of "Recondita armonia" was suitably fervent and well-projected ... "

Tosca, Los Angeles Opera

Falling James, LA Weekly

"As Tosca's doomed lover, Mario Cavaradossi, American tenor Russell Thomas was just as strong as Radvanovsky, exuding a properly robust heroism while maintaining a smoothly vibrant melodicism. Thomas has stunned local audiences several times in the past few years. In 2015, he provided the brooding masculine counterpoint to dueling divas Angela Meade and Jamie Barton's femme-tastic tour de force in L.A. Opera's version of Norma. Last spring, Thomas portrayed Cavaradossi when L.A. Philharmonic performed a non-staged, concert version of Tosca at the Hollywood Bowl."

Tosca, Los Angeles Opera

Jim Farber, San Gabriel Valley Tribune

''You'll undoubtedly be moved by the impassioned singing of African-American tenor Russell Thomas (who hails from Miami) as Tosca's doomed patriot/artist/lover Mario Cavaradossi. The brightness of his tone, the clarity of his full-volume high notes and depth of sincerity are captivating."
"Radvanovsky and Thomas are perfectly matched vocally. They both possess dramatically powerful voices that rise and fall in the richest harmonies, ring with passion and can explode in fiery intensity."

Tosca, Los Angeles Opera

Christopher Cappiello, Los Angeles Blade

"...all men in this rare opera with a single female role — are exceptional as well. Tosca's lover, the painter Cavaradossi, is sung by American tenor Russell Thomas, a gentle giant with a professorial quality and a powerhouse singing voice. When he mounts the three-tiered scaffold in Act One to work on his painting of Mary Magdelene[sic] in Rome's Church of Sant'Andrea delle Valle, his soaring tenor fills the cavernous Chandler with uncommon ease."

Tosca, Los Angeles Opera

Rose Bueno, Daily Trojan

"Russell Thomas, who plays Cavaradossi, is spectacular as well. Thomas' voice is as passionate as the personality of the painter, and he is incredibly emotive in his body language, adding to the show's flow with his challenges against Scarpia and his tender embraces of Tosca. His vibrato is strong and powerful, much like Cavaradossi's courage in the face of death and his passion in the face of love. When Thomas and Radvanosky sing together in perfect harmony, the entire theater becomes energized."

Tosca, Los Angeles Opera

Maria Nockin, Opera Today

"Puccini asks his tenor to sing the aria "Recondita armonia" ("Obscure harmony") very soon after his first appearance on stage, and fully warmed up, Russell Thomas sang it with the golden sounds of a solid, well-honed tenor voice. I would like to hear more of him soon."

Simon Boccanegra, Royal Opera Covent Garden

Peter Reed, Classical Source

"Russell Thomas, making his Royal Opera debut, easily rose to the challenge. I first heard him last year in a concert performance of Donizetti's Belisario and was hugely impressed, and now even more so by his Adorno. Singing with effortlessly heroic tone and graced with ringing top notes, he transformed what can seem an underwritten role into one of thrilling vitality and passion, and any doubts that he'd have problems transferring his bel canto skills to virile, Verdian heft were quickly dispelled. He's quite something."

Simon Boccanegra, Royal Opera Covent Garden

Sam Smith, music OMH

"Making his Covent Garden debut as Adorno, Russell Thomas' voice is similarly expansive, powerful and impassioned ... "

Simon Boccanegra, Royal Opera Covent Garden

Mark Valencia, What's On Stage

"As house debuts go, the Adorno of tenor Russell Thomas is an especial triumph: the young American has a ringing timbre that is as attractive as it is powerful, and his searing impact as the impetuous nobleman will linger long in the memory ... the prospect of hearing him in years to come singing roles like Florestan or Otello provokes tingles."

Simon Boccanegra, Royal Opera Covent Garden

Michael Migliore, www.musicalcriticism.com

"Thomas, who made his debut at the Royal Opera, sang an electrifying Adorno: he as a rich and clarion tone that is colored with a deep reddish hue, but moves along the scale vividly and with passion. He recalls a young Domingo, actually."

Rusalka, North Carolina Opera

John W. Lambert, CVNC.org

"The Prince was Russell Thomas, whose commanding voice and physical presence drew favorable attention throughout. (His performance in the big Washington Messiah last December had little prepared this listener for the superior dramatic skills he displayed in Raleigh.)"

Rusalka, North Carolina Opera

Joseph Newsome, Voix des Arts

"[In] Tenor Russell Thomas['s] ...performance it was the polish and basic loveliness of his singing that compelled affection...the assurance with which he took the Prince's many top A♭s and pair of B♭♭s in the final moments of Act One was spine-tingling...in Act Three, his desolation was that of a man mad with grief and guilt, and the eloquence of Mr. Thomas's singing, again making light of the high tessitura, was wrenching...His cries of 'Lfbej mne, libej, mir mi prej' ('Kiss me, kiss me, set me free') were piercing and all the more crushing for being so resplendently sung, the rise to top C managed without strain. The ease with which Mr. Thomas mastered the range of his music throughout the performance was awesome, and his thoughtful acting was crowned by an understated, sensual account of the Prince's death scene."

Rusalka, North Carolina Opera

Todd Morman, Indy Week

"There's no denying the power of his voice, which sounded particularly rich during a duet with Heidi Melton's Foreign Princess in Act Two. He was poignant in the solo where he begs El-Khoury to kill him with her kiss in the finale, too."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

Eric C. Simpson, New York Classical Review

"Russell Thomas brought tremendous swagger as Loge, the fire sprite of Wotan's court ... he offered a lean, sunny tenor, giving an energetic account of his extended narrative monologue."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

Zachary Woolfe, New York Times

"The fire god Loge (Russell Thomas, sounding bronzed and burnished...) isn't the usual sprightly trickster, but wry and thoughtful."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

Edward Sava-Segal, Bachtrack

"In this New York Philharmonic concert performance, tenor Russell Thomas as Loge, the god of fire with semi-divine status, almost stole the show. His character was more impish and sardonic than dark and manipulative. Until the end, when it was a tad tired, his bright and glossy voice was truly impressive."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

Joshua Rosenblum, ZEALnyc

"Russell Thomas as Loge, the demigod of fire and Wotan's fixer, used his arresting, fine­ grained tenor to negotiate a vocally hefty and morally complex role with thorough success."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

John Yohalem, Parterre Box

"Russell Thomas was one of those Loges who eats up the stage like a hearth fire out of control. The insinuating lyricism of his "snake-oil" sell of the Rheingold's appeal won over the gods and the audience Wagnerians."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

Martin Bernheimer, Financial Times

"Russell Thomas contributed a hearty rather than traditionally slimy Loge."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

Richard Sasanow, BroadwayWorId

"Russell Thomas was Loge, the fire spirit and demi-god, who accompanies Wotan on his search for the gold ring, bringing more personality and energy to the role than frequently heard..."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

David M. Rice, Classical Source

"Russell Thomas was terrific as the wily Loge ... "

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

Francisco Salazar, Opera Wire

"From his entrance, Thomas was playful, walking around the stage singing with a suave tone. As he was describing Alberich's story, Thomas looked toward the audience and his castmates almost interacting with all his surroundings. The switch in dynamics from piano to mezzo forte to forte transported the viewer to each scene he described and what was even more impressive was how he sang this. Wagner wanted Bel Canto style in his singing and Thomas delivered it. The tenor approached each phrase with ease never seeming to lose power or agility. And when he was ready to use his upper register, the voice gleamed."

Das Rheingold, New York Philharmonic

David Shengold, Gay City News

"Increasingly strong tenor Russell Thomas sounded wonderful as Loge and played the fire god with sly understatement."

I Masnadieri, Washington Concert Opera

Charles T. Downey, Washington Post

"Russell Thomas brought a big, emotional tenor to the title role, while Dalibor Jenis sang a sturdy, noble Posa; as good as these two were on their own, they were never better than when singing together, and their avowals of friendship and solidarity — especially in the first act — were a source of considerable delight."

Norma, Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia

Jose M. Irurzun, Seen and Heard International

"American tenor Russell Thomas was a positive surprise in the part of Pollione. From his first entrance on stage he showed a large, attractive and homogeneous tenor, and he faced the difficulties of the score without problems."

Norma, Los Angeles Opera

Jane Rosenberg, Seen and Heard International

"Russell Thomas as the Roman proconsul joined them in an impassioned trio. It was the perfect marriage of orchestra and voice as Thomas matched the power of the formidable Meade and Barton. The character of Pollione, an un-heroic, fickle lover, is far less nuanced than the soprano roles, but Thomas and his ringing tenor managed to bring a tortured yet determined quality to the part, whether in his scenes with his friend, Flavia, or in his anguished duets with Adalgisa or Norma."

Norma, Los Angeles Opera

Jim Farber, Los Angeles Daily News

"Norma requires three exceptional voices to make it sail, and L.A. Opera has gathered together a most impressive trio...Sung with heroic thrust by tenor Russell Thomas, he [Pollionel is a man emotionally conflicted between his role as head of an occupying army that is determined to do away with Druid culture, and his love for not one, but two, Druid ladies."

Norma, Los Angeles Opera

Matthew Richard Martinez, Backtrack

''The rest of the cast included standout tenor Russell Thomas, who sang a fiercly [sic] stentorian Pollione. His is a strong, exciting voice ... "

Norma, Los Angeles Opera

Lyle Zimskind, LAist

"Tenor Russell Thomas is strong and, particularly in Act Two, impassioned as Pollione, who realizes too late the devastating ramifications of his wayward ardor.

Norma, Los Angeles Opera

Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times

"But tenor Russell Thomas' Pollione, who casts off Norma for the younger Adalgisa, presents an unusually believable combination of haughty authority and punishing vulnerability."

Norma, Los Angeles Opera

James Sohre, CNY Cafe Momus

"Tenor Russell Thomas was a robust and fiery Pollione. I first encountered Thomas at the Canadian Opera Company a few year's ago and thought he delivered a fine performance, full of promise. That promise is now fulfilled. Thomas's meaty tenor has a spinto sheen that when added to his interpretative skills places him solidly in the top tier of tenors. In addition to his appealing vocals, Russell was a wholly believable anti-hero."

Norma, Los Angeles Opera

Marc Haefele, Off-Ramp (KPCC)

"All three roles were brilliantly sung in the production by youngish singers at the top of their powers: Angela Meade, Jamie Barton and Russell Thomas."
"Pollione's character may be downplayed in the opera when compared to Norma or Adalgisa, but Russell Thomas at his L.A. Opera debut sang the role with immense strength and presence.'

Norma, Lyric Opera of Chicago

Hedy Weiss, Chicago Sun-Times

"Thomas uses his strong, dependable tenor to suggest just the right sense of entitlement in his relationships with both women."

Norma, Lyric Opera of Chicago

John von Rhein, Chicago Tribune

"The trio with Pollione, sung by tenor Russell Thomas, gave each singer the opportunity to respond to the dramatic situation with appropriate passion ... he was impressive in the penultimate scene with Norma, as Bellini's scoring gave the duet "Gia mi pasco ne' tuoi sguardi" suitable impact."

Norma, Lyric Opera of Chicago

Nancy Malitz, Chicago on the Aisle

"The vocally assertive Thomas, at first all spinto bravado, revealed new complexity as Pollione was forced to go on the defensive."

Norma, Lyric Opera of Chicago

Henson Keysi, Parterre Box

"Tenor Russell Thomas made an impressive Lyric debut, singing Pollione with ardent fervor and a powerful sound ... Thomas' best moments were in the final act, when he softened and made clear his love for Norma."

Nabucco, Seattle Opera

Thomas May, Backtrack

"...Russell Thomas used his robust tenor to shape Verdi's rich melodic lines with heartfelt expression.

Nabucco, Seattle Opera

Melinda Bargreen, Seattle Times

"Her Ismaele, tenor Russell Thomas, sang with a clarion tone quality, polish, and power."

Nabucco, Seattle Opera

Mia T. Vogel, Daily

"...mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton gave an excellent performance, as did her tenor, Russell Thomas, who played Ismaele. For me, their romantic connection, although tender, took a back seat to the magical sonic juxtaposition of Williams' and Bartons' upper voices in contrast to Thomas' tenor in the first act."

Nabucco, Seattle Opera

Gavin Borchert, Seattle Weekly News

"Exchanges of endearments between Fenena and Russell Thomas' Ismaele in Part 1 make a vivid impact ... "

Nabucco, The Metropolitan Opera

Eric C. Simpson, New York Classical Review

"Russell Thomas was in fine voice as her lover Ismaele, finding a noble bearing and singing with robust, caramel tone."

Nabucco, The Metropolitan Opera

Zachary Woolfe, New York Times

"Russell Thomas, a tenor of gorgeously burnished power, and Jamie Barton, whose mezzo pours out like lava, are luxury casting as the star-crossed lovers, lsmaele (Israelite) and Fenena (sigh, Babylonian)."

Nabucco, The Metropolitan Opera

Robert Levine, Bachtrack

"The too-small roles of Fenena, Nabucco's daughter, and her boyfriend Ismaele were cast from remarkable strength, with Jamie Barton as the former, particularly lovely in her final act cavatina, and Russell Thomas lending a strong tenor to the latter."

Nabucco, The Metropolitan Opera

Patrick Clement James, Parterre Box

"Jamie Barton and Russell Thomas are appealing as the lovers Fenena and Ismaele ... As her counterpart, Thomas is more reliable, and equally expressive."

Nabucco, The Metropolitan Opera

Christopher Browner, Classical Source

"Russell Thomas's bright, Italianate tenor was well-suited to the young soldier lsmaele ... "

Nabucco, The Metropolitan Opera

Jim Pritchard, Seen and Heard International

"Russell Thomas's Ismaele -another woefully underwritten role -showed impressive vocal heft."

Nabucco, The Metropolitan Opera

Michael Tanner, Spectator

"The tenor Russell Thomas is an ardent and intelligent -so far as that is possible -lsmaele, the tenuous love interest of the opera ... "

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, Los Angeles Philharmonic

Zachary Woolfe, New York Times

"The first act closes with a tenor aria set to Primo Levi's poem 'Passover' ... "
"Mr. Thomas sang the closing couplet -'This year in fear and shame,/Next year in virtue and in justice' -with ringing power. As he finished at the final rehearsal earlier on Thursday, my eyes filled with tears."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, Los Angeles Philharmonic

Joshua Kosman, SFGate

"Tenor Russell Thomas was a heroic Lazarus, fearlessly punching his way through Adams' heavy orchestral writing..."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, Los Angeles Philharmonic

Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times

"She had exceptional help from ... Tamara Mumford (Martha) and from Russell Thomas (Lazarus), whose tenor resounded like a force of nature."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, Los Angeles Philharmonic

Ted Ayala, Bachtrack

"The latter aria was helped further by the extraordinary voice of tenor Russell Thomas. His silvery, heroic voice-with gleaming, effortless top notes, wondrous legato, seamless range, and impassioned expressiveness-was well worth the wait to hear him; this made one regret that his role in comparison to his companions was relatively small. Part of the thrill of hearing Thomas was the refreshing difference in quality to the voices of his co-stars."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, Los Angeles Philharmonic

Paul Kilbey, Bachtrack

"Heldentenor Russell Thomas was a magnificently massive-voiced Lazarus, stealing the show in Act I to the effect that it was a shame that he wasn't given as much to do in Act II."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

Jessica Duchen, Independent

" ... the American tenor Russell Thomas as Lazarus is charismatic in both presence and tone."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

Mark Valencia, What's On Stage

"Russell Thomas, a WhatsOnStage Opera Poll nominee last year for the Royal Opera's Simon Boccanegra, again demonstrates the stellar calibre of his tenor voice as the sung incarnation of Lazarus."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

David Nice, Arts Desk

"Heroic tenor anguish and energy pour, as in the Barbican concert performance, from Russell Thomas ... "

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

Mark Ronan, Mark Ronan 's Theatre Reviews

"Russell Thomas's stage presence and robust tenor voice as their brother Lazarus made an impressive addition to the cast as the only masculine solo voice."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

David Karlin, Bachtrack

"For me, Russell Thomas produced the two outstanding vocal moments of the evening: the last supper scene that preceded the interval and the scene of Jesus' arrest which followed it. Thomas' career has been picking up Italian heroic roles of late (Pollione, Manrico, Gabriele Adorno and the like) and his voice has a glorious combination of warmth, legato and heroic abandon."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

Miranda Jackson, Opera Britannia

"Russell Thomas has a fine tenor as well as star quality."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

Andrew Clements, Guardian

" ... while the three principal soloists are all, in their different ways, remarkable ... while the tenor Russell Thomas makes the most of Lazarus's passover aria, whose touching melody would not seem out of place in a high-class Broadway musical."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

Sam Smith, music OMH

"As Lazarus, Russell Thomas reveals a brilliantly strong tenor that is both sumptuous and edgy, and his 'Batter My Heart' style aria at the end of Act I is an undoubted highlight of the evening."

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

Fiona Maddocks, Guardian

"Lazarus is sung by Russell Thomas, who created the role at the world premiere in Los Angeles in 2012. His moving showpiece aria, Tell me: how is this night different, continues the Adams tradition of soliloquy arias first heard in Nixon in China ... "

The Gospel According To The Other Mary, English National Opera

Clare Colvin, Sunday Express

"Russell Thomas as Lazarus has a rich and resonant tenor."

Fidelio, Cincinnati Opera

Jay Harvey, Jay Harvey Upstage (blogspot)

"Her [Goerke's] thrilling soprano blended well with the soaring tenor of Rus·sell Thomas as Florestan, whose appearance opening Act 2 had all the heroism and pathos one could want."

Fidelio, Cincinnati Opera

Janelle Gelfand, Cincinnati Enquirer

"Russell Thomas was an excellent vocal match in the role of the wrongfully imprisoned Florestan. He unleashed a tenor of formidable power as he cried out "Gott!" ("God"), singing like a force of nature before collapsing into a fetal position on the prison floor."

Fidelio, Cincinnati Opera

Rafael De Acha, Seen and Heard International

"Though he has made several Cincinnati appearances, the fine singer Russell Thomas was unexpectedly commanding in the role of Florestan on Friday night. Where many a tenor comes to grief in this music, Thomas shone with a clarion top voice, especially in his intelligent delivery of his "Gott, Welch' Dunkel hier!"

Faust, Michigan Opera Theatre

George Bulanda, The Detroit News

"Tenor Russell Thomas, portraying Faust, has a robust, clarion voice ... he nailed the top C squarely in his gorgeous aria "Salut! Demeure chaste et pure." The effect was like a sunburst after a storm."

Faust, Michigan Opera Theatre

Mark Stryker, Detroit Free Press

"Tenor Russell Thomas as Faust brought impressive vocal power to the role ... "

Faust, Michigan Opera Theatre

Sam White, Daily Tribune

"Russell Thomas makes his debut with MOT as the title character ... The American tenor gives a soulful performance as the conflicted character, showcasing the emotional role with every perfectly pitched note."

Don Carlo, Deutsche Oper Berlin

Jesse Simon, Mundoclasico.com

"Russell Thomas brought a big, emotional tenor to the title role, while Dalibor Jenis sang a sturdy, noble Posa; as good as these two were on their own, they were never better than when singing together, and their avowals of friendship and solidarity -especially in the first act -were a source of considerable delight."

Les Contes D'Hoffmann, Canadian Opera Company

Christopher Hoile, Opera News

"As Hoffmann, American tenor Russell Thomas offered heroic tone, great lung-power and just the kind of bronze timbre ideal for French opera."

Les Contes D'Hoffmann, Canadian Opera Company

Tamara Bernstein, Globe and Mail

"Russell Thomas sang the title role with a clear, strong tenor ... "

Les Contes D'Hoffmann, Canadian Opera Company

Arthur Kaptainis, National Post

"Another impressive debutant was Russell Thomas as the drunken protagonist of the title ... his pure, ringing tone and crystalline diction were a joy to hear. And they remained so to the bitter end, a point worth making, this being one of the longer hauls in the tenor repertoire."

Les Contes D'Hoffmann, Canadian Opera Company

Jon Kaplan, Now Toronto

"As the increasingly drunk Hoffmann, Russell Thomas has a beautiful voice; the higher vocal reaches hold no terror for him."

Les Contes D'Hoffmann, Canadian Opera Company

Michael Johnson, ConcertoNet.com

"Russell Thomas encompasses the title role admirably, with sensitive nuance in the right places."

Les Contes D'Hoffmann, Seattle Opera

Melinda Bargreen, Seattle Times

"Russell Thomas displayed a mighty tenor as Hoffmann; this is a remarkable voice .. .lustrously produced."

Cavalleria Rusticana, Deutsche Opera Berlin

Michael Cookson, Seen and Heard

"Giving his all to the part tenor Russell Thomas acted well as the drink soaked love-rat Turiddu whose life is in turmoil. Singing incisively ... the American tenor revealed impressive tone quality."

Carmen, Canadian Opera Company

Michael Vincent, Star

" ... the chemistry between her [Rachvelishvili] and the naive soldier Don Jose, played by tenor Russell Thomas, was compelling throughout. In particular, the love-hate relationship between them moved beyond the ne'er do well gypsy cliches."

"Thomas's voice was most intense in moments of heightened drama and his tone nodded toward a young Pavarotti."

Carmen, Canadian Opera Company

Robert Harris, Globe and Mail

"Thomas was especially interesting in his portrayal of Don Jose, the soldier enticed by the seductive Carmen to leave his regiment and his wife-to-be, and to betray himself and his soul by deserting himself, so to speak. Thomas gave Don Jose a lot of strength -often he's played as a momma's boy betrayed by his genitals with one of Carmen's come-hither stares. Thomas, with his magnificent tenor voice and commanding stage presence, gave us a Jose more sure of himself at the beginning of the opera, and therefore more conscious of his degradation at it's[sic] end."

Carmen, Canadian Opera Company

Michael Johnson, ConcertoNet.com

"His delivery of the flower song had a truly anguished, desperate edge. His burly presence adds to the character's visceral quality."

Belisario, Opera Rara/BBC Symphony Orchestra

Hugh Canning, The Sunday Times

"...one of the finest casts Opera Rara has assembled for Donizetti. Joyce El-Khoury (Antonina) and Russell Thomas (Alamiro) are outstanding."

Belisario, Opera Rara/BBC Symphony Orchestra

Tim Ashley, Guardian

"...tenor Russell Thomas brought the house down as Alamiro."

Belisario, Opera Rara/BBC Symphony Orchestra

Colin Clarke, Seen and Heard International

"Here is a singer with a great sense of character, good stage presence and a fine, ringing tenor voice."

Belisario, Opera Rara/BBC Symphony Orchestra

Peter Reed, ClassicalSource.com

"Capping this impressive quartet was Russell Thomas as Almiro. His singing was consistently fine, at times sensationally so, with abundant heroic tone, an incisive technique and a compelling engagement with the music. At the top of his range, his tenor kept its tone without a hint of bleat, and in the gentler music, his voice was notably sweet and seductive."

Belisario, Opera Rara/BBC Symphony Orchestra

Rupert Christiansen, The Telegraph

"The fluently musical young American tenor Russell Thomas was nothing short of sensational as Belisario’s lost son..."

The Gospel According to the Other Mary; LA Philharmonic

Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times

“The first act closes with a tenor aria set to Primo Levi’s poem ‘Passover’. The serene melody of its opening line — ‘Tell me: How is this night different from all other nights?’ — gradually becomes heated before easing back into tranquility. Mr. Thomas sang the closing couplet — ‘This year in fear and shame,/Next year in virtue and in justice’ — with ringing power. As he finished at the final rehearsal earlier on Thursday, my eyes filled with tears.”

Oedipus Rex, Boston Symphony Orchestra

Jeremy Eichler, The Boston Globe

“Russell Thomas was an appealing Oedipus, his tenor a mix of ardency and sweetness.”

Tales of Hoffmann, Canadian Opera Company Debut

Arthur Kaptainis, National Post

“Another impressive debutant was Russell Thomas as the drunken protagonist of the title. This American’s pure, ringing tone and crystalline diction were a joy to hear. And they remained so to the bitter end, a point worth making, this being one of the longer hauls in the tenor repertoire.”

Venetian Nights Concert w/Nicole Cabell (My Chicago Debut)

Wynne Delacoma, Chicago Sun Times

If Cabell returned as a welcome friend on Saturday, Thomas provided the thrill of discovery. A native of Miami with a resume that ranges from Tamino in "The Magic Flute" at the Metropolitan Opera to the Prince in John Adams' "The Flowering Tree'' in New York, Los Angeles and Tokyo, Thomas has a big, ardent tenor that was a fine match for Cabell's strong soprano. He has ringing top notes and sang with an emotional urgency that turned these stand-alone concert arias and duets into vivid dramas.

A Flowering Tree- New York Premiere

Anthony Tommasini, The NY Times

There are only three solo characters, each performed here by a superb singer in a deeply expressive performance. ... And the strong, clarion-voiced tenor Russell Thomas is the impulsive, awe-struck Prince.

A Flowering Tree, SF Symphony 2007 (US Premiere)

Georgia Rowe, Opera News

"Tenor Russell Thomas sang handsomely as the Prince, conveying the pain and bewilderment of love and loss."

Zaide in Vienna 2006

Larry L. Lash, Opera News

"...most notably, Russell Thomas (Sultan Soliman), whose huge, supple, beautifully-produced tenor sounded ready to conquer Florestan."

Malcolm at the MET

David Shengold, Opera News

"Russell Thomas sounded first-rate in Malcolm's limited duties;"

Morgan Library Recital 2007

Oussama Zahr, Opera News

"Thomas's enormous, fresh, exuberant tenor was ideally suited to Idomeneo's "Eccoci salvi alfin…. Vedrommi intorno," which opened the program. His sound was heroic but still lyrical, with some nice technical touches. His messa di voce at "Sono innocente" was stunning, and he slightly covered the voice to express his sorrow.... In the Beethoven cycle that immediately followed, Thomas proved that ardor need not be reckless. He was clear and assured, even as he surmounted technical hurdles such as the high-lying entrances in "Es kehret der Maien." The compelling character that emerged was both innocent and strong — a youth as strapping as he is inexperienced, rushing toward heartbreak with fleet-footed joy."

Soliman at Lincoln Center Mostly Mozart

Allan Kozinn, NY Times

"Russell Thomas was a menacing and vocally solid Soliman."

Chamber Music Society Lincoln Center

Allan Kozinn, NY Times

"The program also included 2 song cycles based on the poetry of A.E. Housman. Russell Thomas, a tenor with a rich deep sound sang them.... Mr. Thomas and the company drew on its currents of introspection and intensity in an eloquent account."

Rodolfo in Seattle

Melinda Bargreen, Seattle Times

"This "Boheme" was particularly rich in male talent... Thomas' easy high notes and his ardent vocal production made him an eminently believable young bohemian;"

Herald at The MET

David Shengold, Gay City News

"The other new singer was Russell Thomas, who brought a strong, attractive tenor to the brief phrases of the Herald in the auto-da-fé scene."

Tosca in St. Louis

Joe Pollack, KWMJ St. Louis

"Russell Lamar Thomas showed a most appealing tenor as Cavarodossi, Tosca's true love."

Tosca in St. Louis

Robert Boyd, KDHX St. Louis

"Russell Lamar Thomas is a physical and equally energetic Cavaradossi, with a room-filling tenor that is never harsh or strained."

Tosca in St. Louis

Sarah Bryan Miller, St. Louis Post Dispatch 8/18/2002

"...tenor Russell Lamar Thomas gave great promise as Cavarodossi. The voice is big and has a lovely timbre;..."

Pasquale in Spokane

Jim Kershner , The Spokesman-Review

"... the brilliant tenor Russell Thomas on loan from the Metropolitan Opera's Young Artists program. From his first note, it was clear he had a voice of exceptional quality and distinction. Later, we heard that voice in full display in the aria "Com' e gentil".

Upcoming:
Tito in Mozart's La Clemenza di Tito
Salzburger Festspiele
Teodor Currentis, cond.
Peter Sellars, director

Cavaradossi in Puccini's Tosca
Tanglewood Music Festival
Andris Nelsons, cond.

Tenor Soloist in Beethoven's 9th Symphony
Tanglewood Music Festival
Andris Nelsons, cond.

Title role in Verdi's Otello (Role Debut)
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Robert Spano, cond.